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the only person at this 10:30 am screening of a Latvian stop-motion/hand-drawn animation about a family of women and their individual struggles with mental illness.

the only person at this 10:30 am screening of a Latvian stop-motion/hand-drawn animation about a family of women and their individual struggles with mental illness.

tumblr won’t let me post any songs from this album but uhh 🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥

tumblr won’t let me post any songs from this album but uhh 🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥

just copped nyff tickets

Horse Money

Cavalo Dinheiro | Pedro Costa, 2014
Portugal | Portuguese and Creole with English subtitles | Format: DCP | 103 minutes

U.S. Premiere

Since the late ’90s, Pedro Costa has devoted himself to the task of doing justice to the lives and tragedies and dreams of the Cape Verdean immigrants who once populated the now-demolished neighborhood of Fontainhas. Costa works with a minimal crew and at ground level, patiently building a unique cinematographic language alongside the men and women he has befriended. Where does his astonishing new Horse Money “take place”? In the soul-space of Ventura, who has been at the center of Costa’s last few shorts and his 2006 feature Colossal Youth. It is now, a numbing and timeless present of hospital stays, bureaucratic questioning, and wandering through remembered spaces… and it is then, the mid ’70s and the time of the Carnation Revolution, when Ventura got into a knife fight with his friend Joaquim. A self-reckoning, a moving memorialization of lives in danger of being forgotten, and a great and piercingly beautiful work of cinema.

Dreams Are Colder Than Death

Arthur Jafa, 2013
USA | Format: DCP | 52 minutes

In this new essay film, filmmaker and cinematographer Arthur Jafa (Daughters of the Dust, Crooklyn) begins with a question: what does it mean to be black in America in the 21st century? He composes the many troubled and troubling answers, offered in the form of evocative images of African-American men and women (intermingled with more abstract visual correlatives to certain remarks), and spoken answers from former Black Panther Kathleen Cleaver, filmmaker Charles Burnett, poet Fred Moten, artist Kara Walker, and others, into a powerful choral work of sustained, burning intensity. Jafa’s aesthetic strategy of separating sound and image has a political charge: he wanted his interviewees to speak freely, unencumbered by the burden of “survival modalities,” i.e., learned forms of self-presentation for public consumption in general and the white world in particular. As of this writing, we are still in the wake of Eric Garner’s death in Staten Island, the National Guard has been called into Ferguson, Missouri, and Jafa’s haunted meditation seems increasingly relevant as the minutes tick by.

+/-

sukoot:

In America, though, life seems to move faster than anywhere else on the globe and each generation is promised more than it will get: which creates, in each generation, a furious, bewildered rage, the rage of people who cannot find solid ground beneath their feet.

James Baldwin, The Harlem Ghetto.

(Source: allenhjohnson)

jessehimself:

White Syracuse school guard’s ‘joke’ gets black student to assume the position, mom says
Twelve-year-old Brandon Pearson, who has Down syndrome, was excited to start the school year Tuesday, his first day at a new school.
But he and his family were welcomed to the building with a racist joke from a Syracuse school employee, his mother said.
The incident led school officials to suspend the employee while they investigate her complaint.
Brandon was accompanied on his first day at Huntington K-8 School in Eastwood by his mother, Brandiss Pearson, her husband and her father.
When they stopped in front of a hallway mural to snap pictures, a school sentry, or security guard, who is white, inserted himself. Brandon and his family are black.
"Wait, wait, wait, hold on,” Brandiss Pearson recalls the sentry saying. Then the sentry turned Brandon to face the wall and lifted Brandon’s hands above his head on the wall, as if to be frisked, she said.
"And he starts laughing and says, ‘Now take the picture, he’s in the right position,’ ” Pearson recalled.
The insinuation went over Brandon’s head. He kept smiling. But his family members were stunned, Pearson said. They hurried Brandon off to his classroom to meet his teacher and say their goodbyes. Only after she got home did Pearson stop to process what had happened.
"I was shaking, just like fire-breathing mad,” she said. ”All he saw was a little black boy who needed to assume the position.”
Pearson is a registered nurse at St. Joseph’s Hospital Heath Center. She is studying for a master’s degree at Upstate University. She’s on the board of directors for Home HeadQuarters.
"Nothing that I’ve accomplished can change what some people see,” she said.
Pearson’s father snapped a picture of Brandon in the offensive position, but later deleted it from his phone because it made him angry. “He said he did not want to relive that moment one more second,” Pearson said.
Pearson reported the incident to Huntington’s principal Tuesday afternoon. She tearfully confronted the security guard, or school sentry, Wednesday when she saw him in the hallway. He responded that he thought it was “a funny joke,” she said.
School administrators put the sentry on leave Wednesday while they look into the incident, said Michael Henesey, coordinator of communications for the school district. Henesey declined to identify the sentry. Pearson said she did not know the sentry’s full name.
"We are in receipt of the complaint filed against one of our school sentries,” Henesey said in a prepared statement. "The school district has begun an internal investigation into the alleged complaint. The school sentry in question has been placed on administrative leave while the district conducts the investigation. We will not be releasing any more information at this time." [h/t]
Update: Syracuse district fires white school guard for ‘joke’ having black child assume the position

jessehimself:

White Syracuse school guard’s ‘joke’ gets black student to assume the position, mom says

Twelve-year-old Brandon Pearson, who has Down syndrome, was excited to start the school year Tuesday, his first day at a new school.

But he and his family were welcomed to the building with a racist joke from a Syracuse school employee, his mother said.

The incident led school officials to suspend the employee while they investigate her complaint.

Brandon was accompanied on his first day at Huntington K-8 School in Eastwood by his mother, Brandiss Pearson, her husband and her father.

When they stopped in front of a hallway mural to snap pictures, a school sentry, or security guard, who is white, inserted himself. Brandon and his family are black.

"Wait, wait, wait, hold on,” Brandiss Pearson recalls the sentry saying. Then the sentry turned Brandon to face the wall and lifted Brandon’s hands above his head on the wall, as if to be frisked, she said.

"And he starts laughing and says, ‘Now take the picture, he’s in the right position,’ ” Pearson recalled.

The insinuation went over Brandon’s head. He kept smiling. But his family members were stunned, Pearson said. They hurried Brandon off to his classroom to meet his teacher and say their goodbyes. Only after she got home did Pearson stop to process what had happened.

"I was shaking, just like fire-breathing mad,” she said. ”All he saw was a little black boy who needed to assume the position.”

Pearson is a registered nurse at St. Joseph’s Hospital Heath Center. She is studying for a master’s degree at Upstate University. She’s on the board of directors for Home HeadQuarters.

"Nothing that I’ve accomplished can change what some people see,” she said.

Pearson’s father snapped a picture of Brandon in the offensive position, but later deleted it from his phone because it made him angry. “He said he did not want to relive that moment one more second,” Pearson said.

Pearson reported the incident to Huntington’s principal Tuesday afternoon. She tearfully confronted the security guard, or school sentry, Wednesday when she saw him in the hallway. He responded that he thought it was “a funny joke,” she said.

School administrators put the sentry on leave Wednesday while they look into the incident, said Michael Henesey, coordinator of communications for the school district. Henesey declined to identify the sentry. Pearson said she did not know the sentry’s full name.

"We are in receipt of the complaint filed against one of our school sentries,” Henesey said in a prepared statement. "The school district has begun an internal investigation into the alleged complaint. The school sentry in question has been placed on administrative leave while the district conducts the investigation. We will not be releasing any more information at this time." [h/t]

Update: Syracuse district fires white school guard for ‘joke’ having black child assume the position

(Source: yasboogie)