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Because I love my sister Lisa

I love my sister Lisa

I love my sister Lisa most of all

Don’t you know that’s sinful, boy ?

God is what I make of him

Don’t you know that’s sinful, boy ?

God is what I make of him

I’m long since dead and I live in hell

She’s the only girl that I love well

We were raised together and together we fell

God is what I make of him

day long barrage of little, self-corroding interactions. by the end rubbed entirely raw. empty, vertiginous meat bun sack. need to remain aware of the impermanence of this nothingness. that it is not personally definitive.

alternating bites of our grilled peach panzanella salad, chicken waldorf salad, and these jalapeño roasted potatoes. also pictured: some lil baby heirlooms I picked up at the farmers market on my break.

alternating bites of our grilled peach panzanella salad, chicken waldorf salad, and these jalapeño roasted potatoes. also pictured: some lil baby heirlooms I picked up at the farmers market on my break.

merry christmas to me.

probably won’t go to sans soleil, le joli mai, or bestiary + three cheers for the whale. still means 13 screenings over 14 days. most excited for if i had 4 dromedaries + rememberance of things to come, description of a struggle, one day in the life of andrei aresenevich, and a grin without a cat.

An artistic activity such as photography is “literally and figuratively enlivening,” according to Ellen J. Langer, a professor of psychology at Harvard and author of “On Becoming an Artist: Reinventing Yourself Through Mindful Creativity.” “When people are depressed, they tend to retreat from the world. Noticing things in the camera puts you in the present moment, makes you sensitive to context and perspective, and that’s the essence of engagement. I have years of research telling us how good that is for health and well-being.”

A terrorist is called that only because he does not have the power of the State behind him – indeed, he has no State, which is why he is a terrorist. The State, at bottom, and when the chips are down, rules by means of a terror made legal.

James Baldwin on Palestine. (via vul-va)

a monopoly on legitimate violence

(via the-wistful-collectivist)

[…] If Snowpiercer had merely told the tale of an oppressed working class rising up to seize power from an evil overlord, it would already have been an improvement over most of the political messages in mainstream cinema. There are all sorts of nice touches in its portrayal of a declining capitalism that can maintain its ideological legitimacy even when it literally has no more bullets in its guns.

But the story Bong tells goes beyond that. It’s about the limitations of a revolution which merely takes over the existing social machinery rather than attempting to transcend it. And it’s all the more effective because the heart of that critique comes as a late surprise, from a character we might not expect.

[…] All too often, explicitly political art fails as both art and politics. Socialists shouldn’t put up with half-assed imitations of popular genres, nor with political messages denuded of anything but the lowest common denominator.

What makes Snowpiercer satisfying is that it commits neither error. It’s an engrossing and stylish movie, and its underlying themes go beyond merely pointing out class exploitation to challenge the logic of capital. It’s a movie that should be seen as widely as possible, if only so that Bong Joon-ho gets more chances to make movies for English-speaking audiences that badly need them.

been a lot of
geek a while | stop | refine technique and style | continue
on the verge of
geek a while | stop | refine technique and style | continue

been a lot of

geek a while | stop | refine technique and style | continue

on the verge of

geek a while | stop | refine technique and style | continue